Dinosaur Survived A Record Number Of Bone Fractures

Plants and Animals


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An artist's impression showing the multiple injury points. You should have seen the other guy! Leandra Walters

Two paleontologists have uncovered evidence that a dinosaur fossil, excavated way back in 1942, was hiding a record number of injuries. It had at least eight bone fractures and sites of damage through infection. As the new study in PLOS ONE reveals, this beast lived on despite its dramatic injuries – but it probably would have been in a considerable amount of pain.

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Scientists Discover Extraordinary Jurassic Fossil Bed In Argentina

Environment

Patagonia


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The Patagonian landscape as it exists today. kavram/Shutterstock

Palaeontologists in southern Argentina have uncovered an enormous network of fossils dating back to the Jurassic period, enabling them to reconstruct an entire ecosystem that has remained “frozen” in time for around 140 to 160 million years. The discovery occurred in the locality of La Bajada, in a region of southeast Patagonia called the Deseado Massif, where recent soil erosion across an area spanning some 60,000 square kilometers (23,000 square miles) has exposed the fossils.

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$250,000 Shark-Spotting Drone Debuts In Australia

Plants and Animals


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A great white, one of the types of shark spotted off the coast of New South Wales. Andrea Izzotti/Shutterstock

Although the chance of dying from a shark attack in your lifetime is just one in 3.7 million, it doesn’t hurt to be a little vigilant in areas frequently visited by sharks. With this in mind, the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW) has announced that a $250,000 shark attack-spotting rescue drone will soon be trialled in the region.

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Lack Of Sleep Makes You More Likely To Overindulge In Junk Food

Health and Medicine


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Too little sleep could be contributing to the obesity epidemic. Paul Biryukov/Shutterstock

Even though we know it’s not good for us, let’s face it: junk food can be pretty darn tasty, and you’re only human if you struggle to say no to an oozy slice of pizza or fudgy slice of decadent chocolate cake. But if you’re not getting enough sleep, that little devil on your shoulder might be even harder to ignore, leading to poor food choices and some extra inches around the waistline. Now we have an even greater insight as to why that might be, thanks to a new study.

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Researchers Are Using Tarantula Venom To Design New Painkillers

Health and Medicine

Tarantula fangs


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Tarantula venom may be surprisingly useful. asawinimages/Shutterstock

The search for safer, more effective and non-addictive painkillers has led scientists to an unlikely source: tarantula venom. More specifically, a single compound found in the venom of the Peruvian green velvet tarantula, which has been found to inhibit a particular pain receptor on the membrane of neuronal cells. By examining how this molecule works, researchers hope to open up new possibilities for the creation of synthetic painkillers.

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Watch Scott Kelly Return To Earth After Spending A Year In Space

Space


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Scott Kelly (left) and Mikhail Kornienko (right) have spent a year on the ISS. NASA

On March 27, 2015, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko launched to the International Space Station (ISS). Now, almost one year on, they’re preparing to return to Earth from their groundbreaking mission.

Kelly and Kornienko, together with Russian cosmonaut Sergey Volkov who has been on the station for 6 months, will undock from the ISS at 8.05 p.m. EST on Tuesday, March 1 (1.05 a.m. GMT on Wednesday, March 2). Almost three hours later, at 11.27 p.m. EST (4.27 a.m. GMT), they will touch down in Kazakhstan, 342 days since they left Earth.

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Volcanic Eruption Creates New Island Off Japanese Coast

Environment


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The island continues to rise from the depths, as shown in this image taken in November 2015. Japan Coast Guard

A once-hidden Japanese volcano is rising up out of the Pacific Ocean. A new study in the journal Geology has outlined the remarkable evolution of one of the world’s youngest islands, revealing how it formed in two incredibly explosive phases.

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